The Roast Box
Cooking Instructions

Roast beef is the favourite Dish as well at the King’s Table as at a Tradesman’s, and may be said to be the Emblem of the Happy Condition of the English.
A Gentleman of Switzerland, 1726

If ever we needed a reminder of our Happy Condition it’s now…

The British institution that is the Sunday Roast is a reminder that food can deliver so much more than calories. For centuries families and friends have gathered together for comfort and cheer over slices of roast beef, crisp roast potatoes and monumental Yorkshire puddings all liberally doused with gravy. It carries the weight of tradition and childhood memories. And in these non-gathering days it holds the power to transport us back to more congenial days with all our loved ones and think forward to better times ahead.

There’s also a practical reason for it usually being the preserve of large gatherings. All that work, all those trimmings, all the juggling required to make sure everything arrives at the table at its best … But no more! We’ve taken out the hard work so you can knock up a feast fit for a King’s table without needing a Royal kitchen and a brigade of helpers.

Please note ingredients should be consumed by the Sunday of your delivery week and are not suitable for home freezing.

HOW TO COOK

It is best (but not essential) to take the steaks out of their packaging 12 or so hours before cooking. Pat them dry with kitchen towel and place on a plate on the bottom shelf of the fridge away from other items. This will help dry out the surface ready to form a delicious crust.

An hour before cooking take the beef out of the fridge to bring it to room temperature. Remove packaging and pat dry with kitchen roll. Don’t remove any string around the joint until after it’s been cooked and rested. Snip it off when you’re ready to slice and serve. Pre-heat oven to 200°C (180°C fan).

Guideline cooking times are included below, but every oven is different and their temperature gauges are notoriously unreliable. These times are a guide, but we really recommend a meat thermometer (if you don’t have one consider getting one for your next roast session). Also, allow time for a good rest, covered loosely with foil – for the 600g rump about 15 minutes, for the 1.2kg about 20 minutes.

Heat a heavy-gauge uncoated frying pan over a high heat until smoking. Take a small piece of beef dripping from the box of roast potatoes and add to the pan. Season the beef generously with Maldon sea salt and sear on all sides for 5 minutes or so until golden brown all the way round.

For medium-rare cook in the pre-heated oven, turning a couple of times during cooking, for 15-20 minutes (it might be a few minutes more or less depending on how long you seared it for, how many times you open the oven door etc.).
For medium cook for 20-25 minutes (again +/- a few minutes).
If you have a meat thermometer: probe the thickest part of the beef 5 minutes or so before the guide cooking time is up. At the end of cooking, the internal temperature should be at the bottom end of the range, the core temperature will increase as the roast rests.

Rare 42-45°C. Medium rare 45-50°C. Medium 50-55°C

For medium-rare cook in the pre-heated oven, turning a couple of times during cooking, for 25-30 minutes (it might be a few minutes more or less depending on how long you seared it for, how many times you open the oven door etc.).
For medium cook for 30-35 minutes (again +/- a few minutes).
If you have a meat thermometer: probe the thickest part of the beef 5 minutes or so before the guide cooking time is up. At the end of cooking, the internal temperature should be at the bottom end of the range, the core temperature will increase as the roast rests.

Rare 42-45°C. Medium rare 45-50°C. Medium 50-55°C

Empty contents onto an oven tray, spaced evenly. Cook in a hot oven (200°C/180°C fan) for 20-25 minutes, turning occasionally until golden and crispy.

Allergens: MILK, WHEAT

Remove plastic and place in the oven (200°C/180°C fan) for 20-30 minutes until golden brown and piping hot.

Remove plastic and place in the oven (200°C/180°C fan) for 15-20 minutes until piping hot. Finish with a pinch of sea salt and some freshly ground pepper.

Allergens: MILK

Heat a pan and add the greens and butter. Turn the greens in the butter until piping hot. Finish with a pinch of sea salt and some freshly ground pepper.

Allergens: EGGS, MILK, WHEAT

Place in the hot oven (200°C/180°C fan) for 2-3 minutes just before plating up.

Allergens: MILK, WHEAT, SUPLHITES

We’ve done all the hard work for you. The pouch in your box is our gravy base, you just need to add bone marrow. Remove bones from fridge about one hour before using. Very gently so as not to disturb any shards of bone, use a teaspoon to scoop out the marrow – try to keep it as chunky as possible. Empty the contents of the gravy pouch into a pan and bring to the boil. Stir in the chunks of bone marrow and gently whisk so as not to break them up too much. Simmer for 2-3 minutes to cook the bone marrow but not dissolve it and give the gravy a rich unctuous consistency. We like to finish ours with a teaspoon of English mustard to add a gentle kick.

Allergens: Sticky toffee pudding: MILK, EGGS, WHEAT. Sticky toffee sauce: MILK. Clotted cream: MILK

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Sticky toffee pudding for 2
Clotted cream
Sticky toffee sauce

Two options. The cheat’s way (which produces perfect results, but might be a bit too ‘ready meal’ for you…) is to microwave the pot with the lid on for 1 minute 30 seconds on full blast. Let stand for a couple of minutes before taking the lid off. Or… place in a saucepan and pour in boiling water until it comes to two thirds of the way up the pot, topping up with more boiling water during cooking as the water level drops. If the pudding has come straight out of the fridge it will take about 55 minutes to heat through. If you take it out an hour earlier, 45 minutes will be fine. For the sauce, simply warm through in a small saucepan. Once you have a hot pudding, pour the sauce over and dollop (or beautifully quenelle) clotted cream on top.