Valentines Day Hawksmoor at Home box

 

Hawksmoor at Home: The Valentines Box Cooking Instructions

Because nothing says I love you like a hunk of seared beef. This Flintstones-worthy Prime Rib certainly is a real beauty, and the rich, loosely-grained curl of deckle around the edge is revered by steak-heads as the most ravishing of all. Fred and Wilma wouldn’t do Valentines on anything less.

So, embrace your inner romantic; dim the lights and get the candles out. Don your glad rags, check your hair and put some Barry White on low. Break open the bubbly and pour into your best glasses. Sit, sip, stare into each other’s eyes. And wait for your steak to be served.

Well, not quite. You also have to do the cooking…

Please note ingredients should be consumed by the Sunday of your delivery week and are not suitable for home freezing.

A video to an introduction of your box with Executive Chef, Matt Brown can be watched here.

THE DRINKS

For information on the perfect serve, please watch this video.

Allergens: SULPHITES

That bitter-beautiful Italian aperitif with a hint of late summer cherries. Keep in the fridge and pour over ice when ready to serve, perhaps in a glass you’ve put in the freezer for half an hour or so. Garnish with a fresh cherry or an orange slice.

Allergens: SULPHITES

Palmer & Co Brut Reserve has been our house champagne at Hawksmoor for many years now, we think it’s the perfect way to start (and end?) a proper festive meal. This is no wishy-washy house champagne rush job, our friends at Palmer age every bottle for at least 4 years before release (the legal minimum is 15 months) to develop intense biscuity character and full-on complexity.

 

RECIPES

For video instructions on how to cook the main course of your Valentines Box, please see here.

For video instructions on how to heat up your Sticky Toffee Pudding, please see here.

Prime Rib
Maldon sea salt pinch tin

  1. TAKE THE MEAT OUT OF THE FRIDGE AT LEAST AN HOUR BEFORE YOU COOK IT, to bring it up to room temperature.
  2. FIRE UP THE BARBECUE Or, if it’s raining, dig out a heavy cast-iron griddle pan. If you’re using a barbecue we recommend lumpwood charcoal from sustainable sources, and make sure you use eco-friendly non-impregnated firelighters, to avoid any fuel tainting the flavour of the meat. there are three ingredients in a steak: beef, charcoal and salt. Getting all three right is crucial – there’s no point buying a beautiful piece of beef and using lighter-fuel-impregnated briquettes from the local petrol station.
  3. GET THE BARBECUE OR THE PAN REALLY, REALLY HOT You’re looking for white-hot coals on the barbecue, which will take about an hour from lighting. the grill pan needs 5 minutes over a high heat. It should be painful to hold your hand anywhere near the heat source, which is why our grill chefs have to drink so much water
  4. IF YOU’RE INSIDE, OPEN THE WINDOW – there will be lots of smoke.
  5. IF YOUR STEAK IS WET,PAT IT DRY WITH KITCHEN PAPER, otherwise it will struggle to form a decent crust and can pick up some unpleasant boiled-meat flavours. and then, at the last minute, season the meat well with maldon sea salt. You will need to use more than you probably think sensible, but it will help build up a delicious salty crust. Pick up a handful of salt in your right hand and your steak in your left. Throw the salt at it and whatever sticks is the right amount. move the steak around so every surface is coated. If you’re cooking a large sharing steak you’ll need to pat the salt in a little to give you more (yes, more).
  6. DON’T USE ANY OIL ON THE MEAT OR IN THE PAN – if the grill is hot enough the meat won’t stick. as well as being unnecessary, oil tends to add a hint of flavour that doesn’t sit well with good beef. If you’re really worried, you can cut a small piece of fat off your steak (or ask your butcher for a piece) and rub it over the grill with a pair of tongs.
  7. STICK THE STEAK ON Leave it for a couple of moments to start building up a crust, then flip. Carry on turning every couple of minutes until it’s the way you like it, and don’t forget to sear the edges. If the heat is as fierce as our charcoal grill at Hawksmoor you may need to move it more regularly to avoid burning – our grill chefs say every 5 seconds. Don’t overcrowd the grill or the pan – make sure there’s plenty of space between the steaks.
  8. TO CHECK IF YOUR STEAK IS COOKED you can use touch, which our grill chefs do, or you can use a probe, which our grill chefs also do to make sure every steak is perfect. Cooking temperatures are subjective and perceptions even vary from country to country.
    These are Matt’s recommended temperatures, and are a touch more cooked than they might be in France or Spain. the internal temperature should be at the bottom end of each range at the end of cooking and towards the top end once rested.
    — medium rare 55°c to 60°c
    — medium 60°c to 65°c
    — medium well 65°c to 70°c
  9. WHEN YOU’RE HAPPY WITH HOW IT’S COOKED, put the steak on a warm plate and leave it to rest. In the restaurant we rest meat at 56°C (in a thermodyne – a special low-temperature oven) to ensure it doesn’t get cold, which means we can rest it for longer. at home, 5 minutes for a single steak or 10–15 minutes for a large sharing steak on a warm plate should do it. Serve on hot plates.

Allergens: MILK, WHEAT, SUPLHITES

A steakhouse classic with richness and bite. Simply warm through in a small saucepan until piping hot.

Twice-cooked chunky chips
Beef Dripping

An amended version of our triple-cooked chips method that’s more suitable for home cooking. We’ve blanched the potatoes in boiling water and chuffed the edges for ideal crispiness. Then we let them cool and dry out before blanching in beef dripping. Then we boxed them up with some nuggets of beef dripping ready for the third and final cook at home. Simply empty onto an oven tray and roast for 20-25 minutes in an oven pre-heated to 200°C (180°C fan), shaking the tray a couple of times during cooking.

Allergens: FISH, MILK

British broccoli with a spiced anchovy butter inspired by that old-school classic, Gentleman’s Relish (also good smeared on steak…). Take the anchovy butter from the fridge and allow to soften slightly. Trim the ends and steam the broccoli (sprinkle with sea salt before steaming) for 3 – 5 minutes depending on thickness – to check just remove a piece, take a slice off the end and eat. Once you’re happy toss with the softened anchovy butter and serve.

Allergens: MILK, EGGS, WHEAT

Sticky toffee pudding for 2
Clotted cream
Sticky toffee sauce

Two options. The cheat’s way (which produces perfect results, but might be a bit too ‘ready meal’ for you…) is to microwave the pot with the lid on for 1 minute 30 seconds on full blast. Let stand for a couple of minutes before taking the lid off. Or… place in a saucepan and pour in boiling water until it comes to two thirds of the way up the pot, topping up with more boiling water during cooking as the water level drops. If the pudding has come straight out of the fridge it will take about 55 minutes to heat through. If you take it out an hour earlier, 45 minutes will be fine. For the sauce, simply warm through in a small saucepan. Once you have a hot pudding, pour the sauce over and dollop (or beautifully quenelle) clotted cream on top.